Speed kills? Not when it comes to crisis communications

By Axia Public Relations

3380560365_4d556b5253_o-813636-edited.jpgIn many matters, it pays to take your time and think about a decision – that's why mortgages and car loans allow a three-day, penalty-free grace period in many states, just in case buyer's remorse sets in. When it comes to dealing with a corporate crisis, however, time is always of the essence. Here are four reasons why you should move quickly during a crisis.

1. You get to establish the base details. Often the media will build a mountain out of a molehill when it comes to a crisis no matter what the actual facts are. By proactively creating a news release, you establish the ground rules and can then relate the story in a far more sanguine way.

2. You will be consulted on the facts. It is not enough to have truth on your side; the real facts must also be disseminated to your clients. By communicating immediately with your customers, you put them at ease and give them a trusted source to rely on. This mitigates the introduction of falsehoods that can illuminate your company in a far harsher light then necessary.

3. You will be the go-to person for updates. Nowadays, when a crisis occurs, there seems to be a never-ending news cycle that demands information on a continual basis. For better or worse, this gives you the opportunity to further control the dissemination of information. By establishing yourself as the expert, you are likely to be the first point of contact for any media outlet.

4. You control any formal engagements. Whenever a crisis occurs, count on a plethora of lawyers representing victims to descend upon the scene. By first engaging with the victims of a crisis – whether you acknowledge fault or not – you set the tone for any further negotiations.

For more detailed information on the benefits of timely – and proactive! – crisis communications, download Axia Public Relations' free e-book Managing Public Relations in a Crisis today.

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Featured image credit: Creative Commons

Topics: Public Relations, Featured, Crisis Communications

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